Former College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences Dean David Magleby Retires

The College of Family Home and Social Sciences would like to congratulate Dr. David Magelby, professor of Political Science and former Dean of the College on his retirement and outstanding academic and professional career. Professor Magleby taught political science at Brigham Young University from June 1981 to July 2019 and served as the dean of the College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences from 2001-2011. Although his last day was this week, on July 1, 2019, he gave his last lecture in December 2018. Department manager Carina Alleman recalled, “The students and teachers lined the hallway and applauded him as he left the classroom that day. It was pretty cool.”

On June 7th, 2019, the Center for the Study of Elections and Democracy (CSED) also showed appreciation for Magleby by holding a banquet in his honor. A scholarship has been created in his name, and those who will receive the award will be referred to as Magleby Fellows and will receive financial assistance based on academic merit. 

The political science department also honored Magleby in an article about him and his accomplishments in their summer 2019 edition of their newsletter, The Political Science Post. The article describes some of the many contributions that Magleby made to the field of political science during his time here at BYU:

“After coming to BYU as a professor, Magleby was named a Congressional Fellow of the American Political Science Association. This distinction meant he worked for a year with the U.S. Senate Majority Leader, Robert C. Byrd. During that year Magleby provided staff support for the leader, focusing primarily on legislation to reform campaign finance.”

“Magleby is the author of several books. His first, Direct Legislation, is considered the seminal work on initiatives and referenda. Along with the other works Magleby has written, he is the lead editor of a series on presidential election finance, including Financing the 2016 Election. He has also written several works on issues related to soft money in campaigns. In 1990, he served on a bipartisan Senate task force on campaign finance reform and his book on the subject, The Money Chase, was published by the Brookings Institution. In addition, Magleby authors a best-selling American government textbook, Government by the People, which, as of early 2019, was in its 28th edition.”

Prior to joining the faculty of BYU, Magleby was a professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz and the University of Virginia. Magleby received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Utah and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

To learn more about Dr. Magleby and his achievements, read the article in The Political Science Post’s summer 2019 edition.

Celebrating the life of a hero: Brent and Jennie Taylor Family Endowed Scholarship Fund

National and local media alike covered the life and death of Major Brent Taylor, an alumni of the BYU political science department, who passed away last November while deployed in Afghanistan. He had been a successful community leader as the mayor of North Ogden and a loving husband and father of seven children. To help his example and legacy live on, his wife, Jennie Taylor, has decided to create the Brent and Jennie Taylor Family Endowed Scholarship Fund.

As explained on the Major Brent Taylor Legacy Foundation website, the plan with the new scholarship is “to establish a memorial scholarship in Brent’s name at each of his collegiate alma maters–namely, Brigham Young University and the University of Utah… [there will be] one full-tuition undergraduate scholarship each year, awarded in perpetuity [to BYU]; one master’s and one doctoral candidate scholarship each year, awarded in perpetuity.”

Jennie Taylor decided to create the scholarship, because she wishes to continue Brent’s commitment to service. As she explains on the scholarship fund’s website: “It is our desire, as a family, to carry on Brent’s legacy of service, sacrifice and statesmanship in a way that inspires future students to likewise focus on the same. Our cities, communities, state and nation need more of the kind of service-leadership that Brent exemplified. There are many things Brent might have gone on to do with his professional and public-service life, had he had more years of life on earth. Now that he is no longer here to fulfill any such future roles of leadership, that torch must be passed on to the next generation.”

To donate to the Brent and Jennie Taylor Family Endowed Scholarship Fund, go to http://www.majorbrenttaylor.com/. Also, read the article featuring his story in the Political Science Post, the quarterly newsletter published by BYU’s political science department.

Is Insomnia Linked to Suicide?

Can insomnia predict suicidal behavior? Zach Simmons, a graduate student in psychology, with the help of his mentors, Gary Burlingame and Daniel Kay of the psychology department, found in a recent study that symptoms of insomnia are a more accurate predictor of suicidal behavior than thoughts of suicide.  As Simmons explains, “insomnia is associated with suicide, even after controlling depressive symptoms.”

In their study, the researchers wanted to see how suicide, suicide attempts, and non-suicidal groups have different experiences with insomnia, and if it could be a predictor of suicide even when suicidal thoughts were not self-reported.  The study used a sample of 194 patients from a mental health facility in Ogden, Utah, who died in the ten year span from 2008-2018 to find answers. These patients self-reported on suicidality and insomnia, which they defined as “trouble falling asleep or staying asleep” and “(having) thoughts of ending my life.”

Simmons and his mentors found that reports from the groups that both attempted and committed suicide reported experiencing insomnia more often than the non-suicidal group, and whether suicidal thoughts were present or not, insomnia was linked to suicidal deaths. As Simmons explains, “regardless of someone’s self-reported suicidal thoughts, including no thoughts of suicide, self-reported symptoms of insomnia were more frequent in those who died by suicide.” The important findings of this study are that “symptoms of insomnia predict suicidal behavior better than thoughts of suicide.”

So, why is it important to know that insomnia is a better indicator of suicidal behavior, and what do these findings mean for someone who experiences insomnia? Simmons explains: “For those with insomnia, this study highlights that they may be at higher risk of suicidal behavior than those who only have suicidal thoughts. It is significant that insomnia is a better indicator of suicidal behavior because insomnia is a modifiable risk factor that can be treated, and in turn, hopefully reduce suicidality.” To find out more about this important findings of this study, read the entire article here.

Dr. Brian Cannon appointed department chair of History

Dr. Brian Q. Cannon

Dr. Brian Cannon has been appointed as the new department chair of History, effective July 1, 2019. Dr. Cannon replaces Dr. Eric Dursteler, who has served as department chair since 2016.

Of the change, Dean Ben Ogles said, “We are grateful to Professor Dursteler for his effective leadership over the past 3 years and look forward to having Professor Cannon join the ranks of our college leadership team.  Professor Cannon has extensive administrative experience from his 15 years as Director of the Charles Redd Center.  We appreciate the fact that he is willing to return to administrative service by using those skills to lead the History Department.”

Brian Q. Cannon graduated from BYU with a BA in American Studies in 1984. He completed an MA in History at Utah State University in 1986 and a PhD in History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1992. Since that time he has taught at BYU. He teaches upper division courses in the American West in the Twentieth Century, Utah History, and U.S. History from 1890 to 1945. Much of his research focuses upon agricultural settlement, rural community development and federal rural policy in the twentieth century. He has received fellowships and other awards from the Western History Association, the Agricultural History Society, the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies, the Ford Foundation and the Aspen Institute for Humanistic Studies. 

Learn more about Dr. Cannon and the Department of History here.  

New Compassion Focused Therapy: Teaching vulnerability and balance for students

“The LDS culture is particularly good at [having compassion for others] but giving ourselves compassion often feels selfish,” says professor and department chair of psychology Gary Burlingame. “Receiving compassion from others is also difficult for some of us because it… doesn’t fit our self-reliant and perfectionistic values.”

Professor Burlingame and Professor Kara Cattani, Clinical Director of BYU Counseling and Psychology Services, have created a therapy model for college students based on their studies in Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT). “There are 3 flows of compassion,” says Burlingame. “Two ‘in’ (self-compassion and compassion from others) and one ‘out’ (compassion to others).”

Cattani and Burlingame’s model aims to help students move from shaming and blaming to a productive method of changing the mind. “Shame and blame are… whole-person evaluations that are negative. Shame/blame talk uses words like ‘you’re worthless, stupid, incompetent, never going to succeed’—in short, they involve global, whole person condemnation, often for a single behavioral failing.”

Especially at a place like BYU, we all are influenced by our inner critic to some extent. Accepting compassion from others and allowing ourselves to fail requires a vulnerability that might be buried beneath perfectionism. “Once a person is willing to engage in a flow which embraces one’s own vulnerability which can be uncomfortable, the second… measure is behavior activation or action. In the case of compassion from others this would look like reaching out to others—letting them know our need and being willing to receive compassion.”

Being at peace in your mind is more than loving yourself; it’s learning to allow others to love you too. Cattani and Burlingame’s therapy model opens this pathway through compassion and vulnerability. “Students had an increase in their ability to engage in difficult emotions and behaviorally balance self-criticism with self-compassion,” says Burlingame. “This was evidenced by change in bio-markers, such as heart rate variability, for those who learned to increase their compassion flows.”

As the research testifies, if everyone is deserving of empathy in their struggles, you are too. Breaking down walls is painful, but the love that can come through the holes and cracks is worth it.

“The notion of common humanity teaches us that we are part of the human race and should treat ourselves as we would treat others rather than holding ourselves to a higher standard,” says Burlingame. “We, just like our neighbor, need to receive the three flows of compassion.”

Norwegian newspaper features FHSS family history intern Annie Smith


Family: Ola Aas, head of the Friends of the Norwegian Emigrant Museum, intern Annie Smith, and managing director of the Norwegian Emigrant Museum, Terje M. Hasle Joranger, will have a spotlight on genealogy this summer. Photo: Jo E. Brenden
 

By Jo Espen Brenden

Published: 11. juni 2019, kl. 09:29

Translated by Sarah Reed

“You guys are lucky in Norway, which has good archives,” says Anne Smith. This summer, she will be working at the Emigrant Museum and helping visitors find their families.

The Norwegian Emigrant Museum has started an internship-partnership with Brigham Young University in Utah.

This summer, Annie Smith from Provo and fellow student Forrest Emmett, who will be coming later, will hold classes on family research several Saturdays in June and July. And they will give visitors who come to the museum concrete advice on how they can succeed in the search for their family history.

Want to find roots

In the United States, Smith takes concrete courses at the university on genealogy.

“Wanting to find our relatives and family history is particularly strong among us Americans. We are a nation where everyone, at one time or another, was an immigrant. Knowing who you belong to is finding out who you are. And Americans have a strong desire to seek out our roots and see how our ancestors lived,” Smith says.

She has become a genealogy expert:

“I have worked for four years with family research, and have seen a lot of Norwegian archives. I can read old handwriting, Old Norwegian, and even runes. And I have a good knowledge of American archives. So I can not only help Norwegians looking for fellow countrymen who emigrated, but I can also find relatives living in the United States today.”

What’s your tip on how to succeed in finding your family?

“It’s best to start with yourself and your immediate family. Talk to your closest relatives and see how far you can get just through good conversations. From there, you have to decide which part of your family tree that interests you most, which you can supplement with other resources,” says Smith.

“You Norwegians are lucky. You have good free archival material online, which you can search through.”

Just start

Managing Director of the Norwegian Emigrant Museum, Terje M. Hasle Joranger, is happy to have Annie on-site:

“The American students not only help us with day-to-day tasks, but they provide us with valuable expertise. They help create excitement about our museum, and can attract people to come here to visit our collections.”

Joranger says that the internship is just the start of an overseas collaboration:

“We want to actively connect the museum to institutions of higher learning in the United States. Such cooperation is mutually beneficial, not least in connection with the museum having a role as national coordinator for the 200-year anniversary of Norwegian emigration to the United States,” Smith says.

On Wednesday, June 19, the Friends of the Norwegian Emigrant Museum Association will have an evening membership meeting where Annie will talk about identity and genealogy. And the friendship association will make sure to put an extra spotlight on genealogy this summer:

“We will contribute by helping with the practicalities in addition to having some knowledge of the area,” says Ola Aas, head of Friends of the Norwegian Emigrant Museum.

“What is exciting, from our point of view, is that we’re now welcoming young people who come from the genealogy Mecca, who can see things in a completely different way than what we have done so far.”

To see the original article in Norwegian, follow this link https://www.hamar-dagblad.no/hamar/nyheter/amerikanske-annie-skal-hjelpe-folk-med-a-finne-slekten/s/5-80-60246

The BYU Civil Rights Seminar teaches students how to build “beloved communities”

Students participating in the BYU Civil Rights Seminar.

A group of students with majors ranging from English to public health to civil engineering are on a mission to create “beloved communities”. This semester, students of varying racial backgrounds enrolled in the Civil Rights Seminar course and traveled to Alabama and Georgia, where they felt the weight of the Civil Rights movement’s legacy at historical sites, monuments and memorials.

While progress has been made for minorities who have been persecuted in the past, this class sees room for improvement and awareness at BYU and beyond. With percentages of only 1% African American and 82% Caucasian students, BYU has a ways to go in representation.

The purpose of the course was to “Explore frameworks, concepts, models, and examples from the Civil Rights Movement that individual students can utilize as they grapple with the courageous, difficult, and complex history of race relations in the United States.”

After a semester of reading and discussion, the class set off for the South. In the heartland of the Civil Rights movement, students visited sites such as Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthplace, the Rosa Parks Museum, and Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama.

The class not only observed the influence of the movement, but interacted with those who’d been a part of it. Students had private meetings with Martin Luther King Jr.’s barber, one of the original Freedom Riders, a participant in the 1963 Birmingham “Children’s Crusade” and a white pastor of an all-black congregation who worked with King and was a neighbor and pastor to Rosa Parks.

From the teachings of Revered Martin Luther King Jr., this class has adopted a purpose for themselves and their fellow BYU students: to create beloved communities where people love and serve as Christ did. More specifically, their goal is to increase cultural awareness and appreciation for diversity at BYU.

“If the world is truly our campus, then we should be discussing the world and its issues,” says a member of the seminar. Having more required conversations at BYU about racial injustice in America and the world would help students as they move on in their careers and education. Knowing the nature of the world, students would be more equipped to “go forth and serve” when they leave BYU.

“Students can get involved with diverse groups on campus such as Tribe of Many Feathers or the Black Student Union,” says Sociology Professor Ryan Gabriel. This is only one of the many ways students can contribute to a beloved community and broaden their view of human experience. “Additionally, they can take courses that emphasize diverse history and experience.”

To learn more about the Civil Rights Seminar and how to apply to participate in 2020, visit the program webpage.

Successful entrepreneur and founder of PowerSchool returns to graduate from BYU

Greg Porter’s story began during high school in the 1980s. Now, decades later, he will be speaking at this year’s College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences convocation, at which both he and his son will graduate. Since his beginnings as an ambitious teenager, Porter has experienced adventure, success, hardship and risk.

As the student body president of Fremont High School in Sunnyvale, California, Porter was aware of the inefficiencies and challenges facing education. When he and a classmate enrolled in a computer programming class, they created record-keeping software to help teachers and students keep track of grades. Upon hearing about the innovation, other schools paid the two teenagers about $300 to use it in their own programs.

“When I was a kid, I acquired confidence that told me I could pursue anything I wanted,” says Porter. “It wasn’t much, but I learned so much just by stepping out into the real world and starting something on my own.” In his heart, he knew he was meant to become a businessman and intended to find that future in higher education.

Upon coming to BYU, Porter changed his major three times before deciding on Psychology, saying, “If you are drawn to something, check it out. BYU offers the perfect testing ground to explore and learn what your interests and passions are. Don’t run yourself into the ground thinking some majors are better than others. Do what you love.”

Rather than graduating, Porter left school with one class left, deciding to make his fortune and become an entrepreneur. “That’s when I went out and started PowerSchool and started working with the software. I’m not a great programmer myself, but I couldn’t afford to pay someone else to do it so I just dove in and started working on it,” says Porter. “That required me to work without a salary for a year and a half to two years, and I just funded myself.”

Soon he found investors, and PowerSchool became widely popular among school administrators, teachers, students and parents. Gaining momentum across the country, the company was acquired by Apple, Inc. In making the transition, Porter met regularly with Steve Jobs to plan for the future. “I’m so grateful that we found a strategic partner… rather than just somebody that just helped us do what we’re already doing.”

After finding success as an entrepreneur, father, and business owner, Porter came back to BYU to enroll in one final class and earn his degree. On Friday, April 26th, he will not only be the Family, Home, and Social Sciences convocation speaker, but will also graduate alongside his son.

Creating Change: Women in Civic Engagement Spring Workshop

Often times we look at our world, our nation, our city, our neighborhood and see things that we want to change or improve. They can be as simple as a couple potholes or as wide-reaching as tax law. The problem that inhibits us from fixing these things is the lack of knowledge in how to make effective and lasting change.

On Thursday, March 28th, stop by the Spring Civic Engagement workshop to discover how you can make an impact on your environment. The conference is free for anybody to visit and learn from the various panels on women in civic engagement. Featured speakers include women such as the mayors of Provo and Draper, a member of the Utah Department of Commerce and a current and former Utah State Representative.

This event will show people that anyone, especially women, have the power to making lasting impacts and changes for the better. Attending the workshop is a valuable opportunity to learn how you can make your community a better place to live, no matter who you are.

The purpose of any political position is to represent the people in an honest and accurate way. When women run for office, they help better represent their constituents. Regardless of whether or not they become elected officials, running brings new issues and perspectives to light that may help provide ways to begin the enactment of change.

For a view of the full schedule, visit the Office of Civic Engagement website.

BYU marriage and family therapy program honored nationally for research

The BYU marriage and family therapy program was recently named the No. 1 program of its kind for research productivity.

That means the faculty does more research than any other group of marriage and family therapy professors in the United States.

The ranking, published in the leading Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, names four BYU faculty members in the top ten most prolific researchers: Jonathan Sandberg (#2), Russell Crane (#4), Jeff Larson (#5) and Rick Miller (#6). Larson, Crane and Miller were also ranked in the top ten for most-cited research. Professor Shayne Anderson was also listed as the most prolific author for faculty who have been in the field for less than 15 years.

Jonathan Sandberg, Russell Crane, Jeff Larson, Rick Miller and Shayne Anderson
Jonathan Sandberg, Russell Crane, Jeff Larson, Rick Miller and Shayne Anderson.

“We are delighted but not surprised by this recognition of the quality of research by our faculty,” said Alan Hawkins, BYU School of Family Life director. “I think our trajectory for the next 20 years looks even brighter.”

The research from BYU’s program helps develop both the academic and practical approaches to marriage and family therapy. Students in the program work with faculty on research as they go through school, preparing them to recognize and implement evidence-based best practices in their careers.

“More important than the number of articles read or cited is the number of students who were influenced by the process of participating in research and learned how to think critically, theorize about change, analyze data and draw conclusions,” said Sandberg, who also serves as the marriage and family therapy program’s director.

The BYU marriage and family therapy program was founded in 1967 and became fully accredited by the American Association of Marriage and Family Counselors in 1972. The program seeks to be a healing influence in a world struggling to create safe and meaningful relationships by combining ground-breaking research with faith-centered family values.

The No. 1 ranking for the program is based on findings from a study that examined scholarly works published between  1999–2008 and 2008–2015 by faculty in accredited doctoral programs through the U.S.