FHSS Alumnus to Serve as Dean of the Marriott School of Business

FHSS alumni have the potential to lead the world in many positions—including as the dean of the Marriott School of Business.

BYU Economics alumnus Brigitte C. Madrian was recently named as the ninth (and first female) dean of the Marriott School of Business. On January 1, 2019 she will begin her five-year term as dean over the Marriott School’s four graduate programs, ten undergraduate programs and approximately 3,300 students. Madrian is currently the Aetna Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management and chair of the Markets, Business and Government Area in the Harvard Kennedy School.

Brigitte at big tableMadrian comes to this position with a myriad of experience and expertise. Through her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in economics from BYU and her PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Madrian is an expert on behavioral economics and household finance. She has a specific focus on household saving and investment behavior, of which she spoke on in her 2016 FHSS Alumni Achievement Lecture. The work she has done in this field has changed the design of employer-sponsored savings plans in the U.S. and has influenced pension reform legislation around the world. Madrian is also engaged in research on health and uses behavioral economics as a way to understand health behaviors and to improve health outcomes.

Because of her work and service, Madrian received the Retirement Income Industry Association Achievement in Applied Retirement Research Award (2015) and is a three-time recipient of the TIAA-CREF Paul A. Samuelson Award for Scholarly Research on Lifelong Financial Security (2002, 2011 and 2017). In addition to this, she serves as the co-director of the Household Finance working group at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Madrian is also a member of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority Board of Governors, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Academic Research Council, as well as other advisory boards.

BYU Academic Vice President James R. Rasband remarks in an article that current Marriot School of Business Dean Lee T. Perry has left a “long record of setting aside his own passion for teaching and research to instead focus on providing opportunities for his colleagues and for our students.” Madrian will no doubt add to this legacy of service and learning with her own unique perspective and experience.

New Psychology chair Dr. Burlingame: Seeing the department as a small-group setting

Psychology professor Dr. Gary Burlingame is known for a few things.

First, Burlingame enjoys going on three-mile mid-day runs around campus.

Second, he has taught at BYU and served in a variety of positions and roles since 1983; that’s 35 years of service!

And third, he is the newly appointed Department of Psychology chair.

Curious beginnings

Bulingame came from a family of engineers where psychology seemed “a little squishy for a father who was working on NASA contracts.” But when he took an undergraduate psychology course, he was hooked. “We’d read in our textbook (about small group therapy) and we’d split the class, and half of us would go behind a one-way mirror and the other half would form a small group,” recalls Burlingame. “I was able to watch the group dynamic principles that I’d just read about. Then, when I was participating in the group, I was affected by the group and I realized that as human beings, we’re affected by each other.”

Seeing the field evolve

Focusing on both small group settings and measurement, Burlingame has seen how both have evolved over the years. “When I was an undergraduate, we wouldn’t have even dreamed [the measurement methods we are currently using] were possible,” shared Burlingame. During the ’90s, Burlingame recalls utilizing the same chaos theory that was used in “Jurassic Park” in small group behavior to see if you could explain patterns of therapeutic interactions in a group. Several years later, Burlingame would work with Michael Lambert to build a system of measurement that is now used worldwide to make dashboards to monitor mental health.

These same dashboards and ideas were implemented across BYU campus when Burlingame worked in the Strategic Planning and Assessment Office with former BYU president Merrill Bateman to measure mental health among campus communities.

Another major evolution in the field that Burlingame has been a part of is the push to recognize international psychological movements. When Burlingame was first asked to write a chapter in The Handbook of Psychotherapy Behavior Change, a book that he had studied as a graduate student, he wanted to include literature and ideas from outside the United States. He included literature from Canada and from Europe, and from there, he has continued performing research and collaborating with researchers across the world, primarily Bernhard Strauss of Germany.

“It was my vision to have our chapter in the handbook be international. And now that’s what has happened to (almost the entire) handbook. They bring a different kind of therapy and a different perspective.”

Seeing the department as a small group

With his past experience, Burlingame has a good idea of how the university and a department runs.

So, what is he most excited about with this new position? “The fun part [about being a chair] is that I’m a group guy. I get to think of the department as a group that I can make more effective.”

Burlingame’s goal as department chair is to make the psychology department as functional as possible to make it as successful as possible. In order to do this, Burlingame says that you have to make every voice count and make sure that every voice is heard.

“Conflict represents information, that people feel like their voice isn’t being heard,” shares Burlingame. “[When someone raises conflict], it’s an attempt to be heard.”

Burlingame has seen this conflict and need for resolution in his field work in Israel as he worked with Jews and Palestinians and again in Bosnia with Muslims and Serbs.

“We’re social creatures so it doesn’t matter if we’re in Israel, or the ASB, or the Kimball Tower. We want to be noticed because we all think we have something to contribute, otherwise we wouldn’t be here,” comments Burlingame. “So [I want to] make sure that everyone has the chance to contribute and flourish. That’s what we really want to do because everyone wants to flourish.”

New SFL director Dr. Hawkins: Strengthening families by strengthening students

Recently appointed School of Family Life Director Dr. Allen Hawkins will miss teaching and researching, but he is excited for the opportunity to serve and bless the lives of SFL students and faculty.

“For 30 years I’ve been focused on my own research and career, so I’m looking forward to helping others more than focusing on myself.”

A personal focus on the family

While Hawkins began his career studying organizational behavior, he soon found a love for the field of family life.

“At first, I was drawn to the study of children and fathers and the importance of fathers in children’s lives and the importance of children in fathers’ and men’s lives. That’s what drew me in. But the number of questions, problems and issues in this field are so big, so many, so important, and so dynamic, it wasn’t hard to get me hooked really fast.”

Since then, Hawkins has studied many aspects of families and the relationships and marriages that form them. His dedication and focus on the family is marked by his extensive research and service activity (he currently serves as the co-chair of the Utah Marriage Council).

A set vision

The appointment to school director comes with a lot of changes. As Hawkins takes on a more administrative role in the school, he’ll have the opportunity to focus more specifically on the school’s faculty and students.

“I feel a pretty keen responsibility,” shares Hawkins. “I think the School of Family Life plays such an important role in students’ lives, and I think we can be a unique contributor to BYU and its mission, as well as the church’s mission.”

Moving forward, Hawkins is grateful for the decisions and set vision that Dean Barley established during his time as director.

“I’m deeply appreciative that he was able to tackle and resolve difficult issues. And now we’re just moving forward. I think we’re going to maintain a lot of the good direction that Dean has set,” says Hawkins. “I’m also looking forward to others’ input on how we can keep moving forward and improving to meet the changing dynamics of (faculty and students) and public scholarship.”

As for Hawkins’ larger vision for the school, he shares that “the vision is already set—to bless students’ lives so that they can be a light on the hill in terms of their own family lives and so that they can…help to strengthen families wherever they go. That vision continues, but we’ve also got new challenges and new students to be aware of.”

“We do really good work here, and we’re doing work in an area where the need for quality research and scholarship is so needed yet is receiving much less attention. Particularly around marriage, I think we make a really great contribution to the field and to society as well.”

Good luck, Dr. Hawkins as you embark on the next journey in your career and service at BYU!