Recalling the sweet moments from bitter times: peanut butter cups and 9/11

What is the connection between peanut butter cups and 9/11?

As we reflect on the tragic events that occurred on this day 17 years ago, we remember the influential stories of heroism and selflessness that sweetened the heartbreaking experiences undergone by individuals, families, communities, and nations.

At the 2018 Fulton Conference, BYU Sociology professor Mikaela Dufur shared a touching story of one such hero who gave his life at the Twin Towers as he held a door open so that his coworkers could make it to safety. His family anxiously waited to hear news of him, promising him his favorite candies–peanut butter cups.

Click here for the full article.

Professor Dufur’s story is just one of many inspirational and compelling articles shared in the 2018 edition of the College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences’ Connections magazine.

For an interactive copy of the 2018 Connection magazine, click here.

Constitution Day 2018: “The Constitution in the Age of Trump”

President Donald Trump is known for several things:

  1. His infamous tweets
  2. His hair, and
  3. His sometimes controversial policies and presidential actions.

At the 2018 Constitution Day panel event “Hanging by a Thread?: The Constitution in the Age of Trump,” scholars will discuss debates brought up by both sides of the political aisle concerning the health of the U.S. Constitution during the Trump Administration.

Faculty members including Justin Collings and Carolina Nunez from the BYU College of law, Neil York from the BYU Department of History, and Adam Dynes from the BYU Department of Political Science will delve into the Constitution in regard to current political forces and the value of the Constitution in current times.

The event will take place September 17, 2018 from 4:00-5:30 p.m. in the Harold B. Library Auditorium. The event is free and open to students and faculty from all disciplines and the public.

Panel participants expect the discussion to be not only lively, but illuminating as scholars discuss the document that defines the many rights and liberties American citizens all too often take for granted.

 

Candidates and campaigns to visit BYU campus for Political Involvement Fair

It’s the beginning of the school year, and BYU will be bustling with more than just the new student class of 2018.

On Monday, September 10, the Political Involvement Fair will welcome more than six U.S. Senate and House of Representatives campaigns—including campaigns for Senate candidates Jenny Wilson and Mitt Romney—to BYU campus to interact with students and faculty. Individuals will not only get an up-close look at some of their potential national leaders, but they will also learn about political campaigns and how they can volunteer in the political movement.

The Political Involvement fair will be held from 3:30-5:00 p.m. in the Wilkinson Student Center Garden Court and is sponsored by the BYU Public Affairs Society and the BYU Office of Civic Engagement. The Office of Civic Engagement is a campus organization that provides students and faculty with the skills and meaningful opportunities to become engaged in their communities.

Connect with political campaigns and learn about local civic engagement opportunities and BYU Washington Seminar happenings and internships at the 2018 Political Involvement Fair. The event is free and open to students and faculty from all disciplines, and refreshments will be provided.

 

A message from Dean Ogles: Finding our semester swing—together

Getting in the swing of a new semester can be hard.

There’s the inevitable homework assignment that catches you off guard, friends have graduated and moved on, and the changing-of-building acronyms leave you searching for 10 minutes, trying to find the KMBL and wondering what happened to the SWKT.

But you’re not alone in your quest to successfully make it through the semester and your college career.

In a recent address given by College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences Dean Benjamin Ogles to faculty and staff, Dean Ogles refers to the story of nine young men who overcome tremendous hardships during the Great Depression to attend the University of Washington and later go on to win the gold medal in men’s rowing at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

Just like each student on campus wants to be successful, each boy in the boat wanted to find success in their own endeavors. Only by working together, however, were each of the individual young men able to overcome trials and succeed.

Rowers, such as those in the 1936 Olympic boat, only succeed when they come together in a unique harmony and rhythm, when they come together in a perfectly synchronized “swing.”

Sometimes to feel like we’re in the “swing” with a situation or with those around us, we think that we should all be the same (or at least very very similar).We wear similar clothing, we say similar phrases, we try to look like others and we try to act like others.

But in rowing, coaches and rowers suggest that it is better for oarsmen to have differences. They are different in their physique, in their personality, and in their backgrounds.

Quoting the story itself, “In physical terms, for instance, one rower’s arms might be longer than another’s but the latter might have a stronger back than the former. Neither is necessarily a better or more valuable oarsman than the other; both the long arms and the strong back are assets to the boat. But if they are to row well together, each of these oarsmen must adjust to the needs and capabilities of the other. Each must be prepared to compromise something in the way of optimizing his stroke for the overall benefit of the boat.”

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As George Pockock, the builder of the boat that won Olympic gold, shared as inspiration to one of the oarsmen, “A man couldn’t harmonize with his crewmates unless he opened his heart to them. He had to care about his crew.”

When we open our hearts to those around us and when we care about our BYU “crew” is when we will—together—get in the swing of the semester and succeed.

This story of young Olympians applies to us: our college (and university) benefits from our different strengths. We need faculty, staff, and students with various characteristics, backgrounds, and personalities.  As each individual willingly adjusts to, compromises and harmonizes with, and opens us their hearts to their peers, our efforts will be strengthened and benefit the whole campus and college community.

When we are unified in our goals and actions, that feeling of joy and unity is never forgotten.