What is the Future of American Archaeology? Find Out at the Annual Shallit Lecture

Dr. David G. Anderson, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

This year’s Grace Elizabeth Shallit Lecture will be given Dr. David G. Anderson, member of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He will present his lecture, The Future of American Archaeology: A Perspective from the Southeastern United States, on Tuesday, March 17, 2020 at 4 PM in 1060 HBLL.

Anderson will discuss what American archaeology will look like, and how will it be practiced in the years to come. He says the challenges the profession faces moving forward are immense, diverse, and ever changing, and will dwarf those that have dealt with in the past. Some of his thoughts are offered based the history of research in the southeastern United States, as well as his 50 year career of fieldwork, analysis, and reporting in the region. He will ask how we might preserve and learn from the archaeological record has been the subject of many scholarly papers on themes like the development of cultural complexity or the impact of climate change, to more detailed and programmatic state, agency, installation, or site-specific heritage management plans. Based on the lessons learned over the past century, from the New Deal to the modern cultural resource management era, Anderson feels we already have in hand good examples of how to proceed. Nonetheless, careful planning and the development of a strong public and national commitment to preserving our history will be essential. Anderson will discuss how we all have roles to play to ensure that such approaches will prevail, and he has an optimistic about the future.

Theda Skocpol, Harvard Sociologist and Political Scientist, to Discuss "Upending American Politics"

Theda Skocpol, Professor of Sociology and Political Science at Harvard University, will be speaking on Thursday, February 27th at 11 am in WSC 3224 on Upending American Politics: Polarizing Parties, Ideological Elites, and Citizen Activists from the Tea Party to the Anti-Trump Resistance.  This event is open to the public.

Professor Skocpol’s work covers an unusually broad spectrum of topics including both comparative politics (States and Social Revolutions, 1979) and American politics (Protecting Soldiers and Mothers: The Political Origins of Social Policy in the United States, 1992). Her books and articles have been widely cited in political science literature and have won numerous awards, including the 1993 Woodrow Wilson Award of the American Political Science Association for the best book in political science for the previous year. Skocpol’s research focuses on U.S. social policy and civic engagement in American democracy, including changes since the 1960s. She has recently launched new projects on the development of U.S. higher education and on the transformations of U.S. federal policies in the Obama era.

Celebrating Diversity in February

Happy February! It’s Black History Month – an annual celebration of achievements by African Americans and a time for recognizing the central role of blacks in U.S. history.

February 1-29 Black History Month  “My humanity is bound up in yours, for we can only be human together.” ~ Desmond Tutu

February 3 FHE: Vignettes of Black Saints – Learn about inspiring figures in Black Church history such as Jane Manning James, Martha Stevens Perkins Howell, Samuel D. Chambers, and Mary Frances Sturlaugson. Refreshments to follow.

7, 7:30, 8 PM  Education in Zion Gallery – JFSB

February 5, 19, & 26 Lunchtime Jazz Concert – Enjoy an hour of Jazz at noon. Feb. 5th features Greg Stallings, Feb. 19th features the Giddins Family, & Feb. 26th features the Legacy Band.

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM  BYU Library Auditorium

February 6 Race and Immigration Panel Discussion

4:30 PM  B192 JFSB  (Refreshments provided). 

February 6 Marjorie Pay Hinckley Lecture 

Kenneth Dodge, Duke University, Sanford School of Public Policy

Building a System of Care to Help all Children Succeed.

7:30 PM  Garden Court, WSC

February 10 FHE: Vignettes of Black Saints  Learn about inspiring figures in Black Church history such as Jane Manning James, Martha Stevens Perkins Howell, Samuel D. Chambers, and Mary Frances Sturlaugson. Refreshments to follow.

7, 7:30, 8 PM  Education in Zion Gallery – JFSB

February 12 Black History Month: Jazz and the Civil Rights Movement  Galen Abdur Razzaq, aka Flute Juice, is an extraordinary flutist with an extensive performance career. A former educator, composer, arranger, director, and producer of children’s songs, Razzaq has performed and lectured at colleges and universities for over twenty-five years.

4:30 PM – 5:30 PM B192 JFSB

February 14 Valentines Day 

Living Legends  Living Legends captures the essence of ancient and modern culture in a panorama of Latin American, Native American, and Polynesian song and dance. Traditions come to life as talented descendants of these cultures blend authentic choreography, intricate costumes, and heart-pounding music into one captivating show.

7:30 PM de Jong Concert Hall (Tickets Required: eventtickets.byu.edu/)

February 20 Jesus, Gender, and Judaism  Amy-Jill Levine, an expert in both Jewish Studies and Early Christianity, will explore the Jewish context of the historical Jesus and his interaction with and teachings about women. 

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM  238 HRCB

Hickman Diversity & Inclusion Lecture  

Ignacio Garcia, BYU History Department

“A Vision to be Whole: Making BYU a Place Where All of God’s Children can Learn, Teach & Fellowship”

11:00 AM  250 KMBL

February 27 Black Women from Convict Leasing to Mass Incarceration: A Conversation with Talitha LeFlouria 

Come join and listen in on an important lecture with Talitha LeFlouria, she is a nationally recognized Historian and a leading expert on black women and mass incarceration. She is the author of the multi-award winning book called Chained In Silence: Black Women and Convict Labor in the New South, the first history of black, working-class incarcerated women in the post-Civil War Period. 

11:00 AM  B192 JFSB

February 28 BYU Perspectives: A Black History Month Celebration 

Come join us in celebrating Black History Month and the major impact it has had on who we are today. This event celebrates black history and allows students to share their personal perspectives of such through music dance and spoken work. 

Come support fellow students as they share their perspectives.

7:00 PM – 8:30 PM  Wilkinson Center Ballroom

Seeing the Forest and the Trees: The Hickman Diversity and Inclusion Lecture

Dr. Ignacio Garcia, the Lemuel Hardison Redd Jr. Professor of Western and Latino History, will present the first annual Hickman Diversity Lecture titled “A Vision to be Whole: Unlearning Ephraim and Re-engaging 2 Nephi 26:33” on Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 11 AM in 250 KMBL.

The title of Garcia’s lecture focuses on how the doctrine of Ephraim has limited our view as members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. He will discuss the Church’s past doctrine that the members of the tribe of Ephraim were the “chosen people” and those of other genealogical heritages were perceived to be less obedient and worthy. Garcia states that although the Church has rejected this view for many years, it has still appeared in manuals as recently as four years ago. He says while members of the Church reject this thinking “whole-heartedly,” we don’t often realize that it has “seeped into everything we do.” He says this kind of sub-conscious bias is like how “we may reject our parents, but eventually we start turning into them because it is how we were raised.” 

Garcia will talk about how we can move past our mistaken thinking about the genealogical concept of Ephraim by realizing “it’s contrary to what Nephi was preaching in 2 Nephi 26:33, which is ‘the Body of Christ includes everyone, bond or free, male or female,’” regardless of our differences.

When asked to share more details about the lecture, Garcia says that he hopes to “look at differences and diversity as part of creating a whole for all of us as Latter-Day Saints, Americans, and human beings.” To do this, Dr. Garcia says we need to see that all things are integrated, but often our view is too narrow. He compares how we view diversity to how we often view a forest. He says that if we look at a forest but don’t see “the animals, the bushes, and the soil, we’re not really seeing a forest, but just trees.” He says this limited view impacts how we each deal with the issue of diversity, and it keeps us from integrating each person’s experience into our view of God’s kingdom.

During the lecture Garcia says he will “share some personal stories that point out how we often don’t know how to deal with people of color and people who are different.” He goes on to say, “Not only do we not know how to deal with them, we don’t know how to integrate their experiences, wants, and needs into our experience to make it about all of us.”

Garcia will also share some ideas of how we can each improve our vision when it comes to diversity and difference. First, he says that instead of asking people of color about their experiences, “we need to engage in conversations” to avoid asymmetric relationships. He goes on to talk about how we need to examine our relationship with the doctrine of Ephraim, and realize that although we may reject it, its ideas may still cloud our view when interacting with people of color. Finally, Garcia says that “We need to stretch ourselves to break down the forest into all its valuable parts and ask ‘How can we create God’s forest and who belongs in it?’” and also “look around ourselves and ask ‘Am I really creating a forest?’” in our church, academic, professional, and personal circles. Garcia says it is only once we have asked ourselves these questions that we can see the parts of our personal forests that are missing so we can see more than just the trees.        

The Hickman Diversity Lecture is given annually by a faculty member who has been awarded the Hickman Diversity, Collaboration, and Inclusion Award based on their research, teaching, and citizenship in the area of diversity and inclusion. Dr. Ignacio Garcia is the winner of the first award given in 2020.  

Celebrating Diversity in January

January is the era of new beginnings and refining our visions for the rest of the year. We invite everyone to strive for more opportunities where we can learn about one another and how we can continue to celebrate diversity in all its forms. In doing so, we will gain meaningful experiences for our own personal growth.

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, what are you doing for others?” ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • January is National Mentoring Month
  • January 15 The Greening of International Literary Studies: Many Voices, Similar Songs – This presentation will offer a brief global tour of international varieties of ecocriticism ranging from Brazil to China and from France to India. 12:00-1:00 PM, 238 HRCB
  • January 18 is World Religion Day
  • January 20 is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
  • Community Outreach Day: Join us for BYU’s biggest day of service – as we honor Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy through service. Light breakfast, musical performance, and inspirational speaker will be at the event. 8:15 AM – 12:00 PM, Wilkinson Student Center
  • January 22, Martin Luther King, Jr. Walk of Life: Our celebration will begin with a candlelight walk from the Marriott Center Tunnel to our Wilkinson Student Center Ballroom. Our walk will be led by BYU’s ROTC and accompanied with melodic songs by our Gospel Choir. Once we arrive at the Ballroom, we will be addressed by our keynote speaker TBD. 7:00-8:30 PM, Marriott Center Tunnel
  • January 24,  OFF THE MAP: Kuné – Canada’s global orchestra, Kuné, explores and celebrates Canada’s cultural diversity and pluralism. The thirteen virtuoso musicians hail from all corners of the globe and play instruments as diverse as they are. 7:30 PM Pardoe Theatre (Tickets Required: eventtickets.byu.edu/)
  • January 25 is the Lunar New Year
  • January 27 is International Holocaust Remembrance Day
  • January 27, FHE: Chinese New Year – Come celebrate Chinese New Year and learn about why and how it is celebrated. 7, 7:30, 8 PM Education in Zion Gallery – JFSB
  • January 30Panel Discussion: Black-Latino Alliance – 4:30 PM B192 JFSB  

Dr. Kenneth Dodge Shares His System of Care to Help All Children Succeed at the 16th Annual Marjorie Pay Hinckley Lecture

Dr. Kenneth Dodge, Sanford School of Public Policy and Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University

Dr. Kenneth Dodge will deliver his lecture, “Building A System of Care to Help All Children Succeed” on Thursday, February 6, 2020 at 7:30 PM in the Wilkinson Center Garden Court at Brigham Young University. Dodge will discuss how our youngest children, aged 0-4, are not faring well in this nation. Dodge will describe research that shows that although communities have an array of programs for families with young children, they do not have the impact needed to prepare children for kindergarten. His findings indicate the problem is the lack of a systematic way for communities to reach all families. Dodge will propose a new Family Connects System of Care that reaches out to every family giving birth in a community. This program provides short-term home visits from local nurses to assess needs of individual families and connect them with community resources. During his lecture, Dodge will describe three examples of how the Family Connects System of Care program has impacted communities and will describe how Family Connects is being disseminated across the country.

Dr. Dodge is the Pritzker Professor of Public Policy and Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. He is also the founding and past director of the Center for Child and Family Policy. Dodge is a leading scholar in the development and prevention of aggressive and violent behaviors. His work provides a model for understanding how some young children grow up to engage in aggression and violence and provides a framework for intervening early to prevent the costly consequences of violence for children and their communities. Dodge joined the faculty of the Sanford School of Public Policy in September 1998. He is a trained clinical and developmental psychologist, having earned his B.A. in psychology at Northwestern University in 1975 and his Ph.D. in psychology at Duke University in 1978. Prior to joining Duke, Dodge served on the faculty at Indiana University, the University of Colorado, and Vanderbilt University. Dodge has published more than 500 scientific articles and was elected into the National Academy of Medicine in 2015 and is currently serving as the President-Elect of the Society for Research in Child Development.

Dr. Dodge’s address will be the 16th Annual Marjorie Pay Hinckley Lecture, named for the late wife of Gordon B. Hinckley, former president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Admission is free to all members of the public. Brigham Young University established the Marjorie Pay Hinckley Endowed Chair in Social Work and the Social Sciences in 2003 to honor Sister Hinckley’s commitment to strengthening home and family. The chair focuses on understanding and strengthening the family, the development of women, and strategies to help both parents and children in difficult circumstances. Each year, the chair invites a distinguished scholar to deliver a lecture addressing a pertinent social issue.

Neylan McBaine to Examine Women's Suffrage in Utah During the G. Homer Durham Lecture

Neylan McBaine, co-founder and CEO of Better Days 2020.

Neylan McBaine, co-founder and CEO of Better Days 2020, will present the 2020 G. Homer Durham Lecture on Thursday, February 13, 2020 at 11:00 AM in 250 Kimball Tower. McBaine will discuss how February 14, 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of Utah women being the first Americans to vote under an equal suffrage law, fifty years before the nation adopted a constitutional amendment recognizing women’s political rights. How did this pioneering leadership happen right here in Utah? What role did the Church and LDS women specifically play in the national movement to codify women’s rights? And what does this legacy mean for us today? This presentation will explore the rich and unknown story of LDS women’s remarkable actions and ask how we can honor this heritage in our own lives. Better Days 2020 celebrates the 150th anniversary of women first voting in Utah (the first women to vote in the modern nation) and the centennial of the 19th Amendment through education, events and the arts.

 McBaine’s previous marketing experience includes in-house positions at Silicon Valley companies as well as advertising agencies. Her projects include a role in the “I’m A Mormon” campaign, and she brings her understanding of audience and brand to her current work. She has also been an important voice in Latter-day Saint and Utah women’s advocacy for nearly a decade, first as the founder of the Mormon Women Project, a non-profit dedicated to mobilizing Mormon women by telling their stories and exploring opportunities for increasing their voice within the church institution. McBaine’s book Women at Church: Magnifying LDS Women’s Local Impact, which explores possibilities for increased female participation in LDS administration, has been called “a monumental piece of work,” “pivotal,” and “a remarkable resource that belongs in every Latter-day Saint home.” Her work has been anthologized in The Essential Writings of Mormon Feminism, and several other compilations.

Since co-founding Better Days 2020 over two years ago, Neylan has become a leader in speaking and writing about women’s leadership and the U.S. suffrage movement, with a specific focus on Utah and the west’s early role in that movement. She has developed a team of historians, educators and marketers that have changed the way Utahns view and understand women’s history, leading to shifts in current perceptions of ourselves and Utahns generally. Her third book, Pioneering the Vote: The Untold Story of the West’s First Suffrage Triumphs, will be published by Shadow Mountain in February 2020. Neylan is a graduate of Yale University, mother to three daughters, and lives in Salt Lake City.

Celebrating Diversity in December

This Christmas season join BYU in a celebration of our differences by attending a performance or discussion or two.

EVENTS:

December 4

Faith in God: A Black Man’s Perspective: 12:00-1:00 PM 238 HRCB 

PEN Talks: “Nontraditional Families“: Join us in a dialogue held in a safe space with fellow BYU students who will share meaningful & eye-opening experiences on their families that have dealt with divorce, addiction, siblings & parents from the LGBTQ+ community, mental health disabilities, etc.  7:00-8:30 PM Varsity Theater 

December 5 

Celestial Jews and Terrestrial Realities: Come experience an inside look into the fascinating religious identity of Judaism. 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM 382 JSB

December 6

Christmas Around the World: A spectacular performance capturing the rich ethnic diversity of the world through authentic choreography, with more than 200 dancers, singers, & musicians in native costumes. 10:00 AM & 7:30 PM Marriott Center (Tickets Required: eventtickets.byu.edu/)

Celebration of Christmas: Usher in the Christmas season with the combined BYU Choirs & the BYU Philharmonic. 7:30 PM de Jong Concert Hall 

December 7

Christmas Around the World: 2:00 PM & 7:30 PM Marriott Center (Tickets Required: eventtickets.byu.edu/)

Celebration of Christmas: 3:00 PM & 7:30 PM de Jong Concert Hall

December 9

FHE: Christmas in Nauvoo: 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30 PM Education in Zion Gallery – JFSB

Planetarium Show: The Christmas Star: 7:00-8:00 PM Eyring Science Center Room N465 

Special FHE at the MOA with Brian Kershisnik7:00-8:30 PM BYU Museum of Art 

December 11 & 12

Mawlid al-nabiThis Islamic Holiday honors the birth of the prophet Muhammad, who founded Islam. The holiday is celebrated by reading & studying the prophet’s teachings. 

December 25: Merry Christmas!

December 22 – 30

Hanukkah, or Chanukah: An eight-day Jewish celebration that commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, a miracle to many. This celebration begins and ends in the evenings of the respective days.

December 26 – January 1

Kwanzaa: which means “first fruits” in Swahili. Celebrations often include songs & dances, African drums, storytelling, poetry reading, & a large traditional meal. On each of the seven nights, families gather & a child lights one of the candles on the Kinara, then one of the seven values of African culture, is discussed.

December 31: New Years Eve

Hopelessness, Harshness, and How You Can help: Stacey Shaw’s Research on Mental Health among Refugees in Malaysia

Photo by Larm Rmah on Unsplash

Dr. Stacey Shaw is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Work whose interest in her field started by becoming aware of the world around her through getting involved on campus while she attended BYU. After obtaining her bachelor and master degrees in Provo, Shaw worked at the International Rescue Committee, a refugee resettlement agency in Salt Lake, and later went on to earn her PhD at Columbia University. Her research primarily involves work with refugees, both in the United States and internationally.

Refugee Presence in Malaysia

The Southeast-Asian nation of Malaysia remains among the top 10 host countries for refugees on their way to a third country. Over 80% of the 70 million refugees worldwide are hosted by underdeveloped or developing countries and Malaysia on its own host 177,000 refugees and asylum seekers who have very limited legal rights. Working together with community based organizations, Dr. Shaw’s team aimed to better understand the mental health needs of Afghan and Rohingya refugees, however, the studies participants make up only a small percentage of the refugees in Malaysia and their findings do not represent all refugees and should not be generalized.

Refugee’s Conditions

Refugees’ undocumented status in Malaysia resulted in a lack of public services such as healthcare and work opportunities. Across Dari- and Farsi- speaking refugees included in the study, nearly half experienced high levels of food insecurity. Around 17% of the study’s participants were homeless, or, if not, lived in crowded, non-permanent conditions. Other challenges that families experienced that are common to refugee conditions both in the U.S. and abroad were economic wellbeing and disrupted education for school-aged children.  Additionally, many refugees dealt with unwelcoming natives, reporting harassment and extortion by Malaysian authorities. 

Such unfortunate uncontrollable conditions and an uncertain future led to stress that caused hopelessness, difficulty regulating emotions, and lowered cognitive abilities (like memory and decision making). Using a test that measures symptoms of mental disorders (e.g. anxiety and depression) and trauma specifically in refugees, Shaw and her research team found that 98.8% of their participants measured positive for emotional distress symptoms – a percentage four times higher than Shaw expected. One factor, however, associated with lower levels of stress was marriage. Having a partner to share responsibilities and provide social and emotional support may strengthen physical and mental wellbeing.

Moving Forward in Malaysia

Shaw suggests implementing more community resources or opportunities for social support, but believes what is really needed is a large scale policy solution. Key services opportunities to provide social support include additional health, employment, and education services. The refugees expressed genuine desire to discuss the difficulties of living as a refugee and for help developing coping strategies. 

Helping Out At Home

You don’t have to major in social work or go far from home to provide service to refugees here in Utah and internationally.  To get started, Shaw suggests starting with what interest you. Attend lectures, read about the refugee crisis, ask questions, and find people that are doing things that you care about and connect with them. Being informed and politically active will allow you to make a positive difference. There are many opportunities around campus and Utah to get educated and get involved. 

  • Shaw, alongside Christopher Quinlan, advised the student led Refugee Empowerment Club that was recently dissolved into the first university chapter of Their Story is Our Story. Their aim is to educate students raising awareness through guest speakers and connecting students with service opportunities around Utah.
  • BYU’s Center for Service and Learning (Y-Serve) has a Refugee Program that meets once a week to  sort out donations, and make quilts, mattresses, and teddy bears for refugees in Jordan.
  • The International Rescue Committee’s Salt Lake office always appreciates student volunteers to help tutor and mentor refugees.

Would Suffragists Support The Equal Rights Amendment? Find Out at the 2019 Dead Suffragists’ Debate

Would you like to meet some of the women who brought the vote to women 100 years ago? These women who changed the US political landscape may be gone, but you will have a chance to hear their arguments for women’s rights on Thursday, Nov 19, 2019 during the Dead Suffragists’ Debate.

This debate will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, passed June 4, 1919, that states: “The rights of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.” On 18 August 1920, the 36th state ratified the amendment, and 8 days later it was officially adopted.

The Amendment was championed by several of the historical figures that will be on the stage at the Debate. All of them are contemporaries, but each experienced the period in a differently. The debate will be a fun experience to help those attending appreciate both the collective striving for women’s rights and the difficulties of finding common ground. This year two scholars, a BYU faculty member, and a student will be playing the roles of these visionaries:

Barbara Jones Brown, Executive Director of the Mormon History Association, will play Martha Hughes Cannon

Jane Hafen, Emerita Professor of English from University of Nevada, Las Vegas, will play Zitkala-Sa a.k.a Gertrude Bonnin

Jamie Horrocks, a BYU Assistant Professor of English, will play Alice Paul

Kayla Jackson, a BYU Political Science and Global Women’s Studies student, will play Ida B. Wells

While this debate will commemorate the 19th amendment, it will also be considering the Equal Rights Amendment, that states “equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” This amendment was passed by Congress on March 22, 1972. This amendment, which did not require a time limit for ratification, still requires a single state’s vote to be ratified, the state of Utah.

In addition to hearing about these historical figures’ lives, the debate will consider what changed in some communities before, between, and after the legislation of the two amendments, one that has been ratified, the other that has not.

The Debate of the Dead is an annual event held by the Department of History that brings to life historical figures from the past to help shed light on the issues and challenges of their times, and how they effect us today.

This event is free of charge and open to the public. To get more information on the Dead Suffragists’ Debate, contact the History department at 801-422-4636.