Celebrating Diversity in January

January is the era of new beginnings and refining our visions for the rest of the year. We invite everyone to strive for more opportunities where we can learn about one another and how we can continue to celebrate diversity in all its forms. In doing so, we will gain meaningful experiences for our own personal growth.

“Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, what are you doing for others?” ~ Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • January is National Mentoring Month
  • January 15 The Greening of International Literary Studies: Many Voices, Similar Songs – This presentation will offer a brief global tour of international varieties of ecocriticism ranging from Brazil to China and from France to India. 12:00-1:00 PM, 238 HRCB
  • January 18 is World Religion Day
  • January 20 is Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
  • Community Outreach Day: Join us for BYU’s biggest day of service – as we honor Martin Luther King Jr.’s legacy through service. Light breakfast, musical performance, and inspirational speaker will be at the event. 8:15 AM – 12:00 PM, Wilkinson Student Center
  • January 22, Martin Luther King, Jr. Walk of Life: Our celebration will begin with a candlelight walk from the Marriott Center Tunnel to our Wilkinson Student Center Ballroom. Our walk will be led by BYU’s ROTC and accompanied with melodic songs by our Gospel Choir. Once we arrive at the Ballroom, we will be addressed by our keynote speaker TBD. 7:00-8:30 PM, Marriott Center Tunnel
  • January 24,  OFF THE MAP: Kuné – Canada’s global orchestra, Kuné, explores and celebrates Canada’s cultural diversity and pluralism. The thirteen virtuoso musicians hail from all corners of the globe and play instruments as diverse as they are. 7:30 PM Pardoe Theatre (Tickets Required: eventtickets.byu.edu/)
  • January 25 is the Lunar New Year
  • January 27 is International Holocaust Remembrance Day
  • January 27, FHE: Chinese New Year – Come celebrate Chinese New Year and learn about why and how it is celebrated. 7, 7:30, 8 PM Education in Zion Gallery – JFSB
  • January 30Panel Discussion: Black-Latino Alliance – 4:30 PM B192 JFSB  

Dr. Kenneth Dodge Shares His System of Care to Help All Children Succeed at the 16th Annual Marjorie Pay Hinckley Lecture

Dr. Kenneth Dodge, Sanford School of Public Policy and Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University

Dr. Kenneth Dodge will deliver his lecture, “Building A System of Care to Help All Children Succeed” on Thursday, February 6, 2020 at 7:30 PM in the Wilkinson Center Garden Court at Brigham Young University. Dodge will discuss how our youngest children, aged 0-4, are not faring well in this nation. Dodge will describe research that shows that although communities have an array of programs for families with young children, they do not have the impact needed to prepare children for kindergarten. His findings indicate the problem is the lack of a systematic way for communities to reach all families. Dodge will propose a new Family Connects System of Care that reaches out to every family giving birth in a community. This program provides short-term home visits from local nurses to assess needs of individual families and connect them with community resources. During his lecture, Dodge will describe three examples of how the Family Connects System of Care program has impacted communities and will describe how Family Connects is being disseminated across the country.

Dr. Dodge is the Pritzker Professor of Public Policy and Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. He is also the founding and past director of the Center for Child and Family Policy. Dodge is a leading scholar in the development and prevention of aggressive and violent behaviors. His work provides a model for understanding how some young children grow up to engage in aggression and violence and provides a framework for intervening early to prevent the costly consequences of violence for children and their communities. Dodge joined the faculty of the Sanford School of Public Policy in September 1998. He is a trained clinical and developmental psychologist, having earned his B.A. in psychology at Northwestern University in 1975 and his Ph.D. in psychology at Duke University in 1978. Prior to joining Duke, Dodge served on the faculty at Indiana University, the University of Colorado, and Vanderbilt University. Dodge has published more than 500 scientific articles and was elected into the National Academy of Medicine in 2015 and is currently serving as the President-Elect of the Society for Research in Child Development.

Dr. Dodge’s address will be the 16th Annual Marjorie Pay Hinckley Lecture, named for the late wife of Gordon B. Hinckley, former president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Admission is free to all members of the public. Brigham Young University established the Marjorie Pay Hinckley Endowed Chair in Social Work and the Social Sciences in 2003 to honor Sister Hinckley’s commitment to strengthening home and family. The chair focuses on understanding and strengthening the family, the development of women, and strategies to help both parents and children in difficult circumstances. Each year, the chair invites a distinguished scholar to deliver a lecture addressing a pertinent social issue.

Neylan McBaine to Examine Women's Suffrage in Utah During the G. Homer Durham Lecture

Neylan McBaine, co-founder and CEO of Better Days 2020.

Neylan McBaine, co-founder and CEO of Better Days 2020, will present the 2020 G. Homer Durham Lecture on Thursday, February 13, 2020 at 11:00 AM in 250 Kimball Tower. She will discuss how February 14, 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of Utah women being the first Americans to vote under an equal suffrage law, fifty years before the nation adopted a constitutional amendment recognizing women’s political rights. How did this pioneering leadership happen right here in Utah? What role did the Church and LDS women specifically play in the national movement to codify women’s rights? And what does this legacy mean for us today? This presentation will explore the rich and unknown story of LDS women’s remarkable actions and ask how we can honor this heritage in our own lives. Better Days 2020 celebrates the 150th anniversary of women first voting in Utah (the first women to vote in the modern nation) and the centennial of the 19th Amendment through education, events and the arts.

 McBaine’s previous marketing experience includes in-house positions at Silicon Valley companies as well as advertising agencies. Her projects include a role in the “I’m A Mormon” campaign, and she brings her understanding of audience and brand to her current work. She has also been an important voice in Latter-day Saint and Utah women’s advocacy for nearly a decade, first as the founder of the Mormon Women Project, a non-profit dedicated to mobilizing Mormon women by telling their stories and exploring opportunities for increasing their voice within the church institution. McBaine’s book Women at Church: Magnifying LDS Women’s Local Impact, which explores possibilities for increased female participation in LDS administration, has been called “a monumental piece of work,” “pivotal,” and “a remarkable resource that belongs in every Latter-day Saint home.” Her work has been anthologized in The Essential Writings of Mormon Feminism, and several other compilations.

Since co-founding Better Days 2020 over two years ago, Neylan has become a leader in speaking and writing about women’s leadership and the U.S. suffrage movement, with a specific focus on Utah and the west’s early role in that movement. She has developed a team of historians, educators and marketers that have changed the way Utahns view and understand women’s history, leading to shifts in current perceptions of ourselves and Utahns generally. Her third book, Pioneering the Vote: The Untold Story of the West’s First Suffrage Triumphs, will be published by Shadow Mountain in February 2020. Neylan is a graduate of Yale University, mother to three daughters, and lives in Salt Lake City.

Celebrating Diversity in December

This Christmas season join BYU in a celebration of our differences by attending a performance or discussion or two.

EVENTS:

December 4

Faith in God: A Black Man’s Perspective: 12:00-1:00 PM 238 HRCB 

PEN Talks: “Nontraditional Families“: Join us in a dialogue held in a safe space with fellow BYU students who will share meaningful & eye-opening experiences on their families that have dealt with divorce, addiction, siblings & parents from the LGBTQ+ community, mental health disabilities, etc.  7:00-8:30 PM Varsity Theater 

December 5 

Celestial Jews and Terrestrial Realities: Come experience an inside look into the fascinating religious identity of Judaism. 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM 382 JSB

December 6

Christmas Around the World: A spectacular performance capturing the rich ethnic diversity of the world through authentic choreography, with more than 200 dancers, singers, & musicians in native costumes. 10:00 AM & 7:30 PM Marriott Center (Tickets Required: eventtickets.byu.edu/)

Celebration of Christmas: Usher in the Christmas season with the combined BYU Choirs & the BYU Philharmonic. 7:30 PM de Jong Concert Hall 

December 7

Christmas Around the World: 2:00 PM & 7:30 PM Marriott Center (Tickets Required: eventtickets.byu.edu/)

Celebration of Christmas: 3:00 PM & 7:30 PM de Jong Concert Hall

December 9

FHE: Christmas in Nauvoo: 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30 PM Education in Zion Gallery – JFSB

Planetarium Show: The Christmas Star: 7:00-8:00 PM Eyring Science Center Room N465 

Special FHE at the MOA with Brian Kershisnik7:00-8:30 PM BYU Museum of Art 

December 11 & 12

Mawlid al-nabiThis Islamic Holiday honors the birth of the prophet Muhammad, who founded Islam. The holiday is celebrated by reading & studying the prophet’s teachings. 

December 25: Merry Christmas!

December 22 – 30

Hanukkah, or Chanukah: An eight-day Jewish celebration that commemorates the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem, a miracle to many. This celebration begins and ends in the evenings of the respective days.

December 26 – January 1

Kwanzaa: which means “first fruits” in Swahili. Celebrations often include songs & dances, African drums, storytelling, poetry reading, & a large traditional meal. On each of the seven nights, families gather & a child lights one of the candles on the Kinara, then one of the seven values of African culture, is discussed.

December 31: New Years Eve

Hopelessness, Harshness, and How You Can help: Stacey Shaw’s Research on Mental Health among Refugees in Malaysia

Photo by Larm Rmah on Unsplash

Dr. Stacey Shaw is an assistant professor in the Department of Social Work whose interest in her field started by becoming aware of the world around her through getting involved on campus while she attended BYU. After obtaining her bachelor and master degrees in Provo, Shaw worked at the International Rescue Committee, a refugee resettlement agency in Salt Lake, and later went on to earn her PhD at Columbia University. Her research primarily involves work with refugees, both in the United States and internationally.

Refugee Presence in Malaysia

The Southeast-Asian nation of Malaysia remains among the top 10 host countries for refugees on their way to a third country. Over 80% of the 70 million refugees worldwide are hosted by underdeveloped or developing countries and Malaysia on its own host 177,000 refugees and asylum seekers who have very limited legal rights. Working together with community based organizations, Dr. Shaw’s team aimed to better understand the mental health needs of Afghan and Rohingya refugees, however, the studies participants make up only a small percentage of the refugees in Malaysia and their findings do not represent all refugees and should not be generalized.

Refugee’s Conditions

Refugees’ undocumented status in Malaysia resulted in a lack of public services such as healthcare and work opportunities. Across Dari- and Farsi- speaking refugees included in the study, nearly half experienced high levels of food insecurity. Around 17% of the study’s participants were homeless, or, if not, lived in crowded, non-permanent conditions. Other challenges that families experienced that are common to refugee conditions both in the U.S. and abroad were economic wellbeing and disrupted education for school-aged children.  Additionally, many refugees dealt with unwelcoming natives, reporting harassment and extortion by Malaysian authorities. 

Such unfortunate uncontrollable conditions and an uncertain future led to stress that caused hopelessness, difficulty regulating emotions, and lowered cognitive abilities (like memory and decision making). Using a test that measures symptoms of mental disorders (e.g. anxiety and depression) and trauma specifically in refugees, Shaw and her research team found that 98.8% of their participants measured positive for emotional distress symptoms – a percentage four times higher than Shaw expected. One factor, however, associated with lower levels of stress was marriage. Having a partner to share responsibilities and provide social and emotional support may strengthen physical and mental wellbeing.

Moving Forward in Malaysia

Shaw suggests implementing more community resources or opportunities for social support, but believes what is really needed is a large scale policy solution. Key services opportunities to provide social support include additional health, employment, and education services. The refugees expressed genuine desire to discuss the difficulties of living as a refugee and for help developing coping strategies. 

Helping Out At Home

You don’t have to major in social work or go far from home to provide service to refugees here in Utah and internationally.  To get started, Shaw suggests starting with what interest you. Attend lectures, read about the refugee crisis, ask questions, and find people that are doing things that you care about and connect with them. Being informed and politically active will allow you to make a positive difference. There are many opportunities around campus and Utah to get educated and get involved. 

  • Shaw, alongside Christopher Quinlan, advised the student led Refugee Empowerment Club that was recently dissolved into the first university chapter of Their Story is Our Story. Their aim is to educate students raising awareness through guest speakers and connecting students with service opportunities around Utah.
  • BYU’s Center for Service and Learning (Y-Serve) has a Refugee Program that meets once a week to  sort out donations, and make quilts, mattresses, and teddy bears for refugees in Jordan.
  • The International Rescue Committee’s Salt Lake office always appreciates student volunteers to help tutor and mentor refugees.

Would Suffragists Support The Equal Rights Amendment? Find Out at the 2019 Dead Suffragists’ Debate

Would you like to meet some of the women who brought the vote to women 100 years ago? These women who changed the US political landscape may be gone, but you will have a chance to hear their arguments for women’s rights on Thursday, Nov 19, 2019 during the Dead Suffragists’ Debate.

This debate will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, passed June 4, 1919, that states: “The rights of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.” On 18 August 1920, the 36th state ratified the amendment, and 8 days later it was officially adopted.

The Amendment was championed by several of the historical figures that will be on the stage at the Debate. All of them are contemporaries, but each experienced the period in a differently. The debate will be a fun experience to help those attending appreciate both the collective striving for women’s rights and the difficulties of finding common ground. This year two scholars, a BYU faculty member, and a student will be playing the roles of these visionaries:

Barbara Jones Brown, Executive Director of the Mormon History Association, will play Martha Hughes Cannon

Jane Hafen, Emerita Professor of English from University of Nevada, Las Vegas, will play Zitkala-Sa a.k.a Gertrude Bonnin

Jamie Horrocks, a BYU Assistant Professor of English, will play Alice Paul

Kayla Jackson, a BYU Political Science and Global Women’s Studies student, will play Ida B. Wells

While this debate will commemorate the 19th amendment, it will also be considering the Equal Rights Amendment, that states “equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” This amendment was passed by Congress on March 22, 1972. This amendment, which did not require a time limit for ratification, still requires a single state’s vote to be ratified, the state of Utah.

In addition to hearing about these historical figures’ lives, the debate will consider what changed in some communities before, between, and after the legislation of the two amendments, one that has been ratified, the other that has not.

The Debate of the Dead is an annual event held by the Department of History that brings to life historical figures from the past to help shed light on the issues and challenges of their times, and how they effect us today.

This event is free of charge and open to the public. To get more information on the Dead Suffragists’ Debate, contact the History department at 801-422-4636.

Trust the Process: Gordon Limb on Strengthening the Stepfamily

Photo by Blake Barlow on Unsplash

Speaking at the Virgina F. Cutler Lecture, Dr. Gordon Limb reported data from the BYU Research study STEP (Stepfamily Experiences Project), including risks and benefits of growing up in stepfamilies.

Limb’s lecture presented statistics on the changing family environment with emphasis on the Native American family. His research with STEP has found that regardless of ethnicity, family processes are more important than family structure.

Helpful Family Processes during Remarriage Transitions:

  • Think about the age of children when making adjustments: kids under 5 tend to feel abandoned, between 5-8 blame themselves, at ages 9-12 kids will side with one parent or the other, however, all children under 9 adjust to change more easily.
  • A Negative Co-Parenting situation can trigger depression in the child. Negative co-parenting can be anything from having different homework standards, forcing the children to take sides during arguments, or enforcing different bedtimes.

Limb’s research with Native Americans in the STEP Project found:

  • On average Native American children are more “insecurely attached” during transitions than Caucasians, expressing feelings of anxiety, emotional distance, and clinginess.
  • Allowing children to establish a good connection with their stepsiblings can make a big difference.

Overall, Limb found that Children adjust well to different environments and situations if there is consistency, continuity, and efforts to build positive relationships between stepsiblings and stepfamilies.

2019 Chauncy Harris Lecture Discusses the Balance Between Humans, Wildlife, and the Environment

Marguerite Madden, Professor and Director Center for Geospatial Research; Department of Geography, University of Georgia will give the 2019 Chauncy Harris Lecture on Thursday, November 21st at 11:00 AM in 250 KMBL. Dr. Madden’s lecture will examine understanding elephant movements and linkages to development, local communal farming and drought towards mitigating Human-Elephant Conflict in Africa.

Dr. Madden’s research interests include GIScience and Landscape Ecology, including remote sensing, geographic information systems (GIS), spatio-temporal analysis, geovisualization and geographic object-based image analysis, as applied to landscape-scale biological/physical processes and human-impacts on the environment.

Dr. Chauncy Harris and his family endowed the Chauncy Harris Distinguished Lecture at Brigham Young University in 2003. Dr. Harris graduated from BYU in 1933 at the age of nineteen with a degree in geology and geography. He was BYU’s first Rhodes Scholar and the valedictorian of his graduating class. He later earned a second B.A. from Oxford and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Chicago. Dr. Harris is best known for his work in urban geography and the geography of the Soviet Union/Russia.

Think, Pray, Don’t Forget Your GPS – The Recipe for Life by Alumni Achievement Recipient Clayton Brough

Photo by Tabea Damm on Unsplash

Last Thursday, the College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences awarded Geography Alum R. Clayton Brough with the Alumni Achievement Award. Brough is a graduate of the College’s bachelor (‘73) and masters (‘75) programs of geography, though with the ease and eloquence that he delivered his lecture it was evident that he’d had many years of practice in front of cameras and crowds as a schoolteacher and weekend climatologist for ABC 4. Brough shared with us valuable lessons accompanied by entertaining anecdotes of his life, while bringing an encouraging spirit into the room during his lecture “5 Lessons I’ve Learned in 50 Years.”

Lesson 1: Think Carefully before You Agree to the Wishes of Others

In opposition to the culture of ‘sending it,’ Brough encourages his listeners to “not push send until you’ve thought of the end.” Giving us a very real and very comical example of a mistake he made while here at BYU that led to people believing he had married his sister, Brough reminded us that even innocent good deeds could not end well if the end is not thought through first.

Lesson 2: Don’t Leave Home without a GPS Receiver

Throwing it back to the good ol’ days of no Google, no Siri, and a hard-to-read paper map, Brough related his experience as a young Geography student to the importance of remembering to take our spiritual guides with us wherever we go.  On an assignment to map Utah County, Brough and partner accidentally found themselves in the middle of the Dugway Proving Ground, a military training area where new tactics and technology are tested. Whether it be the still small voice or the strict direction of Siri, sometimes in life it takes a couple of wrong turns in life to realize how important it is to have a way to get back to the right place.

Lesson 3: Nourish a Good and Clean Sense of Humor

A good sense of humor is not just a fun personality trait, but was extremely beneficial for Brough when he dealt with negative comments during his time as a forecaster. Brough emphasized the importance of being nice, and, again, thinking before you send.

Lesson 4: Find Happiness through Serving Others Including Those on Both Sides of the Veil

The cheerful buzz in the room paused for just one moment as Brough recalled the cancer diagnosis of both he and his son. Brough, however, is grateful for the opportunity he had to reprioritize the things in his life. Cancer caused him to slow down and appreciate his family and the eternal significance of everything in this life. This focus sparked Brough’s passion for genealogy and family history work, something he and his wife Ethel Mickelson now do together.

Lesson 5: If You want to be Successful, Dream Big, Work Hard, and Pray Often

Brough spent 30 years working with students and in that time learned that we must allow even the youngest students to dream big and think outside the box. Students at Eisenhower Junior High proved to be a testament of that as the holders of seven world records. A feat made possible by a handful of creativity, a spoonful of studiousness, and a dash of daring dreams.

Clayton Brough ended as he started, encouraging us to keep a sense of humor and remember to serve. Brough has since retired and now works at the Counselling Center at Copper Hills High School in West Jordan, Utah.

Geography Alum R. Clayton Brough is Recipient and Lecturer for Alumni Achievement Award

In 1975, when Robert Clayton Brough was graduating with his masters in geography, BYU was celebrating its centennial birthday. On October 17, BYU’s College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences will be celebrating the life and achievements of R. Clayton Brough. Though Brough will be receiving an award from the College for distinguished achievements in his studies of geography, majority of Brough’s career was spent as an educator. For over thirty years, Brough taught Taylorsville middle school students geography, journalism, and science. The David O. McKay School of Education has also recognized Brough for the lives he touched throughout his career as a teacher. Brough will be giving his lecture Thursday, October 17, 2019 at 11 a.m. in 250 KMBL.

Brough taught people both in and out of the classroom. While most people use the weekend to relax after a taxing 9-5 week, Brough spent his time out of the classroom informing the people of Utah of the weather. For twenty-eight years, Clayton Brough served the citizens of Utah with a sunny smile as the weekend broadcast climatologist for ABC 4. A bright and lovable TV personality elevated Brough to something of a local celebrity, known best for his weekend spots and special 8-14 day forecast. This two-week glance proved helpful for Utahns in seemingly unpredictable seasonal weather.

Brough’s geographic background no doubt contributed to his success as a meteorologist and climatologist. He has held numerous board positions as a climatologist including the Vice President of the American Geographical Research Corporation of Utah, an organization dedicated to studying regional climates. Brough credits Dr. Richard H. Jackson and Dr. Dale J. Stevens, two BYU alum and geography professors Brough had during his time here as a student, for teaching him how to successfully interact with his students and inspire them to achieve their goals and dreams. Though Brough attributes these professors for helping his teaching career, they’re influence undoubtedly contributed to Brough’s own dedication to scholarly excellence. Years after his graduation, Brough came back to school and researched Utah climate with faculty members at BYU and Utah State University. Since then, he has published multiple scientific articles discussing the climate and geography of Utah. Brough’s degree did not limit his interest to education and climate. With a passion for his faith and family history, Brough has also published more than thirty articles relating to genealogy.

Genealogy is truly a passion of Brough’s. He has served four different times as Chief Genealogist for the Brough Family Organization, one of the world’s largest and oldest non-profit ancestral family organizations and surname associations. Brough has also served as secretary of the LDS Ancestral Families Association and was a member of the International Genealogy Consumer Organization for fourteen years. Of course, Broughs own direct family is of the greatest importance to him. His last night on air he stated that his leaving would fulfil his wish to “conserve my energy, preserve my health, and spend more time with my wife, children, and grandchildren.” Broughs immediate family consists of over a dozen grandchildren, four children, and his wife, Ethel Mickelson, of over forty-five years.

The college is honoring Clayton Brough for his academic achievements, though the rest of his life has truly been a model of the age-old saying “life is what you make it. Not only is Brough a cancer survivor, returned missionary, and an Eagle Scout, his teaching career was uniquely filled with the breaking of numerous Guinness World Records that he achieved with his students and coworkers. Amongst Eisenhower Junior High’s collection of records were World’s Largest Pan Loaf, World’s Longest Paperclip Chain, and World’s Fastest and Largest Human Mattress Dominoes. Eisenhower also held the record for most records held by one group. These record-beating feats were not all fun and games, Eisenhower teachers reported that they taught “teamwork, logistics, [and] problem-solving” to the students. Join us Thursday, October 17 to listen to Clayton Brough discuss his studies, world records, and more in his lecture “5 things I’ve Learned in 50 Years”.